Getting The California Property Buyer Tax Credit

How do you know what your loan officer is making on the back? It is disclosed, but you need to know what you are looking at. It’s called ‘yield spread premium’ or YSP. Be careful of this though. Just because you don’t see it does not mean it’s not there. When your loan officer is selling you a loan from his own company, he does not need to disclose the YSP. The YSP is what the ‘broker’ charges over what the lender offers. If dealing direct with the lender there is no YSP. Even if the loan officer can get you that 6.5% and sells you the 7% instead, because he woks for the lender there is no YSP. Ask if he is a broker or direct lender. As with almost anything either can be sold well.

CTEC approved provider Prop. 90 allows a county to choose to accept or deny Prop. 13 and accept a grandfathered property value assessment when buying a new home. As of June 1, 2005, seven California counties honor Proposition 13; Alameda, Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Ventura.

Since the amount of mortgage you qualify for is a by product of the total payment your income can support (lets say 33% of your pre-tax income), the higher the total of items like taxes and insurance the less room there is for monthly principal and interest payments and thus the lower the amount of loan you can expect to be approved for.

CTEC classes First. Yes, it’s true that stocks and real estate prices have been dropping more lately than they’ve been going up… but if prices are low, that means it’s a BUYER’S market.

You must file an application within three years of buying your new home. It is not too late if you bought and sold a few years ago as long as you qualify and apply in time.

CTEC courses Our local governments, our cities and counties have aggravated the problem by unrestricted spending, and child care providers while they affirm that they are seeking ways of easing the property tax burden without affecting anybody (which is of course impossible), home insurance premiums have skyrocketed, and no big relief is in the horizon, no change. Except for home prices. Because hardly anybody can buy them any more. Now you ask me when these prices are going to go up again; when people will start buying homes again, when we will be back to normal. Do you think I can perform magic?

Then one morning I got a call from Kevin, “If I don’t make the $2,000 payment to the 2nd trust deed holder, he will start foreclosure in 2 days. Kevin also told me “The 2nd trust deed lender said that he would buy the Pasadena apartment building for what I had paid for it, 4 years ago, $525,000.” The offer had a stipulation to it. Kevin had to bring the loan current first. In my mind, if Kevin could bring the loan current, why would he even bother to sell the property for a wholesale price? I couldn’t believe what I was hearing.